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What It Takes to Ride Down the Etna’s Suffocating Mouth

Think of Etna’s crater as a lava sink with an opening at the bottom, leading to the unknown. I’ll have to slow down to zero…

Saturday, Jan 14

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Think of Etna’s crater as a lava sink with an opening at the bottom, leading to the unknown. I’ll have to slow down to zero before getting to the bottom to avoid sliding straight into hell. What am I thinking? First of all, even though Etna has been quiet for the last few weeks, it could wake up again at almost any time because it is one of the most active volcanoes in the world. Located in Sicily, Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world. Etna’s height is changing following its volcanic activity. After the eruption in 1981, its peak was 3,350 metres but the release of magma caused the volcano to drop, so in 2018, the height was only 3,326 metres. The current volcano has four peaks: the Bocca Nuova, Voragine, Northeast Crater and Southeast Crater.

I have to be particularly careful because the surface is covered with sharp lava gravel. I discovered not to be the master of my handlebars after riding on the volcano slopes during the first test ride. The gravel is crumbling under the wheels, and all it took was a small mistake to fall over the handlebars. The result was a dislocated collarbone. It hurts but I can’t give up. Local people back in the town asked me why I was doing this. Why? Probably because I can. And because nobody else has ever done it before.

It wasn’t easy to find the date for the Etna run. Waiting for good […]

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