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Turin Bicycles Closes Its Doors After 51 Years in Denver

Turin Bicycles Closes Its Doors After 51 Years in Denver

Turin Bicycles sponsored biking club. Courtesy of Turin Bicycles Alan Fine, the founder of Turin Bicycles in Denver, fell in love with European lightweight bikes…

Saturday, Apr 16

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Turin Bicycles sponsored biking club. Courtesy of Turin Bicycles Alan Fine, the founder of Turin Bicycles in Denver, fell in love with European lightweight bikes early on. “My friends and I explored the world on our bikes,” Fine says. “There’s a moment when you get out there, on a good quality bike, where the bike disappears, and it’s just you flying through the air.” So getting a job at Chicago’s Turin Bicycles, one of the first in the U.S. to import high-end bike parts from European vendors in the 1960s, was a no-brainer for the 22-year-old bike lover. At Fine’s suggestion, Turin expanded to Denver in 1971, bringing the then-humble cow-town something its small-but-devoted group of serious road cyclists needed: access to imported upper-end bikes and bike gear. Parts weren’t the only import, though. Even though the city’s oldest bike shop just closed its doors after 51 years in business, Turin ignited a lively culture of road cycling that is still popular in Colorado today.

From the beginning, Turin captured something in Colorado. It didn’t take long for cyclists from across the West to flock to Turin’s first location at 711 Grant Street. “We started to pull away from the pack and weren’t just that neighborhood bike store anymore,” Fine recalls. “We were getting customers from everywhere because you couldn’t get the products we had.”

Turin Bicycles eventually purchased its own single-story building on Lincoln Street in 1991, where the shop would spend the rest of its days. Turin’s longtime involvement […]

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