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This is what great cycling infrastructure looks like

This is what great cycling infrastructure looks like

CYCLING SERIES No 1: For Australia to reach zero emissions by 2050, we will need to rethink how we get around. Car-centric suburban sprawl with…

Tuesday, Apr 19

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CYCLING SERIES No 1: For Australia to reach zero emissions by 2050, we will need to rethink how we get around. Car-centric suburban sprawl with gas-guzzling cars and SUVs won’t get us to our destination.

Along with building walkable communities and investing in public transport, we will also need to see a dramatic uptick in the number of people who use active transport, including on bikes, to get around.

In recent decades, we have seen big investments in dedicated cycleways and bike paths across our major cities.

However, far more needs to be done to make cycling a viable option, not just as a leisure option or a way to commute to the CBD from the inner suburbs, but also for everyday trips around our neighbourhoods.

Yet far too often, Australian suburbs end up with unprotected bike lanes in gutters, bikes sharing footpaths with pedestrians, or worse, cyclists competing with cars and trucks for space on busy main roads.

So what does best practice cycling infrastructure look like? Why isn’t it being built as quickly as it’s needed? And what can be done about it?

For this five-part series, The Fifth Estate reached out to academics, planners and cycling advocacy groups to find out. They included: Dr Tony Matthews, a senior Lecturer in engineering and the built environment at Griffith University Professor Matthew Burke, the chair Transport Academic Partnership (TAP) Chair and the Transport Innovation and Research Hub (TIRH) chair at Griffith University’s Cities Research Institute. Peter McLean, CEO of Bicycle NSW Ian Ross, […]

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