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They want L.A. to rein in the mighty car to make streets safe. Will drivers go along?

They want L.A. to rein in the mighty car to make streets safe. Will drivers go along?

Bicyclists chat on a stretch of Griffith Park Drive that has been indefinitely closed to cars to improve safety after a cyclist’s death in April.…

Wednesday, Aug 10

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Bicyclists chat on a stretch of Griffith Park Drive that has been indefinitely closed to cars to improve safety after a cyclist’s death in April. In the city where the car is king, activists are pushing to claim strips of the biggest boulevards for bicyclists and walkers.

Their fight has played out at Griffith Park, where streets were recently closed after a cyclist was killed . It spilled out along the steps of City Hall where advocates staged a die-in. And now, it could make its way to the ballot box in a vote that will test traffic-weary Angelenos’ willingness to put themselves on a so-called road diet to make streets safer and the air cleaner.

Los Angeles City Clerk Holly Wolcott cleared the way this week for a 2024 voter initiative that fast tracks the city’s own ambitious traffic plan to create hundreds of miles of more walkable and bikeable streets by implementing it every time roads are repaved. The Los Angeles City Council must now decide whether to send it to voters or adopt it outright.

As it is, the 7-year old city plan reworks some of Los Angeles’ most storied boulevards, adding bicycle lanes, building wider sidewalks, planting more trees and creating more visible crosswalks. Originally meant to be achieved over 20 years, the document offers a guide that can be modified over time to adjust to changing needs, city planners say. But the blueprint became bogged down by red tape among city departments, lawsuits and lack of political […]

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