Select Page

Survivors of intimate partner violence say educational reforms could help break the cycle of abuse

Survivors of intimate partner violence say educational reforms could help break the cycle of abuse

Survivors of intimate partner violence say a lack of education on the issue is driving up numbers in Saskatchewan, which had the worst rates among…

Monday, Dec 11

News

Survivors of intimate partner violence say a lack of education on the issue is driving up numbers in Saskatchewan, which had the worst rates among provinces in 2022. (CBC Graphics) WARNING: This story contains details of intimate partner violence

Crystal McClean says it was the beginning of a new year when she decided she needed to leave her abusive partner. It took more than a year for her to make it happen for good.

"I was in an abusive relationship — physically, mentally, emotionally and sexually," she said.

"I left probably over 50 times and just kept returning. I couldn’t break the cycle."

Now separated and on a path to recovery, she wants to see educational reforms to try to lower Saskatchewan’s troubling rates of domestic violence . In 2022, Saskatchewan had the highest provincial rates of police-reported family violence in the country with 730 victims per 100,000 population, and of intimate partner violence (IPV) at 732 per 100,000.

McClean said a lack of resources and education around IPV is driving the numbers up. Other survivors and educators agree. Crystal McClean says she has physically recovered from the abuse she sustained in a previous relationship, but the emotional scars linger. (Pratyush Dayal/CBC) McClean, a teacher, is trying to be part of the solution by sharing with her students what she has learned the hard way.

"We need to educate and empower people about the first signs of domestic violence. We need to start with our youth. We need to teach them healthy boundaries and […]

Share This