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Recalling a century of gridlock, America’s first subway, and integrating a cycling club

Recalling a century of gridlock, America’s first subway, and integrating a cycling club

Bostonians take pride navigating their city and the ancient T below it. In 2018, an urban planner comparing city layouts in the US and abroad…

Thursday, Mar 03

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Bostonians take pride navigating their city and the ancient T below it. In 2018, an urban planner comparing city layouts in the US and abroad had this to say : “I find Boston’s street patterns illegible and difficult to navigate. But as a newcomer I can settle for the concomitant sense of wonder, bafflement, and inexplicable adventure that accompanies every simple right turn.” Take a ride with us here through the Globe’ s reporting on transportation going back to the 19th century. You’ll find some of it all too familiar. Early biker’s path

January 27, 1878: “In the use of the bicycle, Boston has led the rest of the country,” the story on the cycle craze reported. Bostonians owned “probably 50″ bicycles. Kittie Knox broke race and gender barriers in cycling in the 1890s.Globe archives Before the T, we complained about horse-cars

“I come to my business around eight o’clock A.M., and I have not been able to find a seat in a Metropolitan horse-car . . . for the past three weeks. I have been obliged to stand all the way from the starting point to Chester Park, and have had not less than 15 or 20 associates each time who have been similarly situated.” — May 10, 1872, Letter to the editor They can’t stop Kittie Knox

In 1893, a time cycling was only considered proper for white men, the West End seamstress joined the national League of American Wheelmen — helping break gender and race barriers. […]

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