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Green light for Tasman walking and cycling strategy to make streets safer

Green light for Tasman walking and cycling strategy to make streets safer

Separated cycleways are a feature of Tasman District Council’s Walking and Cycling Strategy 2022-52.​ Separated cycleways and 30kph speed limits in urban streets are part…

Wednesday, Jun 08

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Separated cycleways are a feature of Tasman District Council’s Walking and Cycling Strategy 2022-52.​ Separated cycleways and 30kph speed limits in urban streets are part of a 30-year strategy to make Tasman roads safer and easier for pedestrians and cyclists.

Elected members on the council’s strategy and policy committee in late May adopted the strategy, which has a target of doubling the number of trips made by walking and cycling to work and school in urban areas by 2030 and tripling them by 2050 .

As transportation planning officer Clare Scott presented the final document to councillors, she described the strategy as aspirational and said it was about holistic network planning.

“We know now that designing our road networks for cars is not enough … we need to ensure the safety of all our road users,” Scott said. “Making sure that everybody [who] wants to has the choice to walk or cycle safely and conveniently.”

READ MORE:
* Car parks to go, paving way for cycle lanes under draft Tasman strategy
* Developers in Richmond call for earlier upgrade of busy McShane Rd
* Urban designer calls for flyover option to be driven out of Richmond plan
* Bypass and flyover options as Richmond tackles transport growth Strategy and policy committee chairman and Richmond ward councillor Kit Maling says the walking and cycling strategy is a high-level document and there could be changes at the detailed design phase. Sustainable transport lobby group Nelsust and the Nelson Tasman Climate […]

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