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From body fat to power output: anatomy of a Tour de France rider

From body fat to power output: anatomy of a Tour de France rider

© Photonews.be Over the course of this year’s Tour de France, each pro cyclist will ride 3,328km – roughly the distance from London, England, to…

Monday, Jun 13

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© Photonews.be Over the course of this year’s Tour de France, each pro cyclist will ride 3,328km – roughly the distance from London, England, to Tbilisi, in Georgia – complete half a million pedal revolutions, and ooze 150 litres of sweat – enough to fill a bath tub.

In order to complete this extraordinary challenge, Tour riders need extraordinary bodies. And thanks to the growth in sports science data and fitness trackers, we are now able to see exactly how superhuman Tour de France riders really are… BODY WEIGHT: 60-66KG

Pro cyclists often have very different physiques, from muscular sprinters to spoke-thin climbers. But scientific research suggests that the all-round riders who need to climb for the general classification title typically weigh 60-66kg – a huge 20kg lighter than the average man in the UK (83.6kg). They also boast a Body Mass Index (BMI) – a measure of a person’s ideal weight in relation to their height – of 19-20, which straddles the border between ‘healthy’ and ‘underweight’. The most recent winner of the Tour de France, Tadej Pogacar of Slovenia, weighs just 66kg. HEART RATE: 42BPM

Data from wearable fitness experts Whoop has revealed that Tour de France riders have an average resting heart rate of just 42 beats per minute (bpm). According to the American Heart Association, 60-100bpm is considered normal, so Tour riders have a significantly lower resting heart rate than the rest of us. Thanks to years of fitness training, their hearts are so fantastically […]

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