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‘Forced’ Cycling May Best Help Those With More Severe Motor Symptoms

‘Forced’ Cycling May Best Help Those With More Severe Motor Symptoms

Parkinson’s patients who have more severe motor symptoms are more likely to derive a benefit from high-cadence dynamic cycling, an analysis of two cycling studies…

Thursday, Apr 21

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Parkinson’s patients who have more severe motor symptoms are more likely to derive a benefit from high-cadence dynamic cycling, an analysis of two cycling studies indicates.

Findings were in the study “ Body Mass Index and Exercise Effort Influences Changes in Motor Symptoms After High-Cadence Dynamic Cycling in Parkinson’s Disease ,” published in Frontiers in Rehabilitation Sciences .

High-cadence dynamic cycling involves cycling on a stationary bike that is programmed to intermittently quicken pedal speed, “forcing” people to pedal faster than they might otherwise. Some early studies suggest that this form of exercise can help to ease motor symptoms of Parkinson’s, but some patients appear to benefit more than others.

A pair of scientists at Kent State University in Ohio conducted a battery of statistical analyses to look for factors that might make individuals more likely to benefit from high-cadence dynamic cycling.

Data on 31 Parkinson’s patients from two prior studies evaluating this exercise intervention were included in the analyses. Patients were an even mix of sexes, and on average just under 70 years of age. In both studies, participants completed 30-minute sessions of high-cadence dynamic cycling — one study covered three sessions over four days, while in the other patients did six sessions over two weeks.

Motor symptom severity before and after these interventions was assessed using part three of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS).

In addition to demographic factors, such as age and body mass index (BMI, a ratio of weight to height), the researchers assessed the effect of effort […]

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