Select Page

Editorial: All must accept that few cyclists want to ride Richmond Bridge

Editorial: All must accept that few cyclists want to ride Richmond Bridge

A cyclist rides toward Marin County on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022. (Sherry LaVars/Marin Independent Journal) What if we spent $20…

Saturday, Nov 11

News

A cyclist rides toward Marin County on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022. (Sherry LaVars/Marin Independent Journal) What if we spent $20 million of taxpayers’ money on creating a bike path that few people used?

That sums up the state’s costly four-year “trial” of turning an upper-deck lane of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge into a bike path.

At the end of this test, it is time for common sense and reality.

Compared to the 80,000 vehicles that cross the bridge on weekdays, the number of bicyclists averages 115 on weekdays and 325 on weekends.

The result is bumper-to-bumper traffic inching along to get on the westbound deck and a little-used bike path.

The trial has clearly proved that very few bike riders are interested in pedaling across the 5.5-mile bridge.

Meanwhile, they’ve taken up a lane – one that for many years had been reserved for maintenance and emergency access – that could be used to address the growing number of motorists and commercial vehicle traffic that rely on the bridge.As Marin Assemblymember Damon Connolly has stressed, the traffic jam not only causes a debilitating drag for workers bound for Marin jobs, but the pollution caused by the congestion on the highway and side streets fouls the air for neighborhoods in Richmond, many of which are home to lower-income and minority residents.A state-funded study recently showed that Richmond communities near Interstate 580 are experiencing higher exposure to harmful pollutants.Connolly authored legislation calling on the state to open the bike lane to traffic […]

Share This