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Disc brake pads explained: organic vs sintered vs semi-metallic

Disc brake pads explained: organic vs sintered vs semi-metallic

All disc brakes, whether hydraulic or mechanical, operate in the same way, by pushing two disc brake pads against the sides of the rotor to…

Sunday, Mar 13

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All disc brakes, whether hydraulic or mechanical, operate in the same way, by pushing two disc brake pads against the sides of the rotor to slow or bring your bike to a halt.

As with most things in cycling, however, even a seemingly simple, consumable component such as disc brake pads come in a variety of options.

Over time, the pads on your bike will get worn down, so you need to check regularly for pad wear before replacing them.

You can also change and upgrade your pads if you’re not happy with the braking performance, with different pads better suited to different conditions.

But which disc brake pads do you need for your bike? Here’s everything you need to know, including how disc brake pads work, when to replace disc brake pads, and the different materials that are available. How do disc brake pads work?

Mountain bike disc brakes have been commonplace for a long time now but, in recent years, discs have also become the de facto standard on road bikes and gravel bikes .

As a result, discs are by far the most common type of bike brake on the latest performance-focused machines. But how do they work?A disc brake pad is made up of a block of braking material bonded to a metal backing plate. The metal plate adds structural rigidity to the braking surface and holds it in position within the brake caliper.When you apply a bike’s brakes, pistons in the caliper push the pads against the spinning rotor, […]

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