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Cycling Through COVID-19: Berlin

Cycling Through COVID-19: Berlin

Photo: Nathan Wright, Unsplash, CC Editor’s note: This article is part of the “Cycling Through COVID” series from world-renowned cycling researchers Ralph Buehler and John…

Wednesday, Oct 12

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Photo: Nathan Wright, Unsplash, CC Editor’s note: This article is part of the “Cycling Through COVID” series from world-renowned cycling researchers Ralph Buehler and John Pucher and is published with permission from the authors. In this series, we’ll explore how 14 large cities around the world adjusted their cycling policies during the first years of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as how those policies contrasted with their approach in the decades prior. In each, Buehler and Pucher also explore how each city’s plans for future investment in cycling infrastructure and programs have been impacted by the pandemic. Read the rest of the articles in this series as they’re published here , or check out the full article in Sustainability. Berlin

Berlin is Germany’s largest city (3.5 million inhabitants) and capital. The share of trips by bicycle increased from 10 percent in 1998 to 18 percent in 2018. Berlin has a polycentric settlement structure with strong neighborhood centers. As a result, more than half of all daily trips are shorter than five kilometers and could easily be made by bicycle.

In 2018, Berlin adopted a new mobility law to reverse a decades-long trend towards increasing car use. The law prioritizes walking, cycling, and public transport with the goal of increasing traffic safety and equitable accessibility, reducing air pollution, noise, and traffic congestion, fighting global climate change, and distributing public space more fairly among transport modes.

During the COVID-19 crisis, permanently installed bicycle counters detected an increase by 22 percent in cycling from […]

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