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Cycling shells, vests, and gloves: How to stay comfy in ‘shoulder season’ weather

Cycling shells, vests, and gloves: How to stay comfy in ‘shoulder season’ weather

Don’t miss a moment from Paris-Roubaix and Unbound Gravel, to the Giro d’Italia, Tour de France, Vuelta a España, and everything in between when you…

Friday, May 13

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The eastern sky has a faint hint of light as I pedal down my row of brownstones in Brooklyn, heading out on a ride. It’s 48F (11C) degrees, but by midday, it will be 70F, partly sunny with a 50 percent chance of rain. I plan to be 50 miles from my Brooklyn home, riding a shaded rolling road by a river that ends in a climb. I plan to wear a thin, thermal jersey, a windproof vest, long finger gloves, and knit shoe covers. Temperate weather will not favor us until late May. Until then, we waffle in “shoulder season,” with widely variable weather conditions. I’ve done a thousand of these rides, first as a commuter, and later as a roadie. This is the cycling apparel I’ve found that works best. Also included are a few tricks to using what you have to work on a budget.

A general guide to dressing for success during spring and fall rides: check the hourly weather forecast the morning of the ride, and be sure to check the weather at your destination/halfway point if it’s a long ride; bring packable outerwear; wind-proofing can do a lot; use layers and loft to stay warm including for hands and feet, and if you’re bold: use embrocation. I’m a fan of Mad Alchemy embro and if it’s really […]

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