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Cycling: Don’t lose track

Cycling: Don’t lose track

Representative image. Credit: Pixabay Photo DH PHOTOS/B H Shivakumar/ PUSHKAR V/ RASHEED KAPPAN “A cyclist is bad for the economy” proclaimed a meme that went…

Saturday, Aug 20

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Representative image. Credit: Pixabay Photo DH PHOTOS/B H Shivakumar/ PUSHKAR V/ RASHEED KAPPAN “A cyclist is bad for the economy” proclaimed a meme that went on to list how a cyclist is inimical to doctors and fast food jobs. While many took it as satire, it is important to point out to others that a study done for the League of American Bicyclists estimates that bicycling related activities contributes $133 billion to the American economy, supports over one million jobs, and brings in nearly $18 billion in tax revenue.

The ‘Cycle to Work’ platform in India has tracked more than one lakh trips of cyclists from 480 companies and 67 cities across the world. They have clocked 8.7 lakh kilometers, saved more than 90,000 litres of petrol and have become so popular that smart cities across India are beginning to adopt it to transform their cities.

Fully segregated lanes

Check out DH’s latest videos But these impressive numbers are not why you would pick up cycling. Among various behavioural biases and social norms you carry, the feeling of safety when you are on the streets riding a bicycle is primary. Across the world, a variety of interventions have led to cyclists feeling safe enough to step out in numbers. These include fully segregated bicycle lanes and traffic calmed streets that prioritise cyclists. This has not been the case in India.

Bengaluru embarked on experiments with bicycle lanes around 2012 in Jayanagar. They died a slow death due to encroachment by […]

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