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Could an NFT cycling club ever work?

Could an NFT cycling club ever work?

When TV’s Matt Stephens posted a cartoon drawing of himself on Twitter he couldn’t have foreseen the immediate backlash. That is, if the image had…

Saturday, Mar 26

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When TV’s Matt Stephens posted a cartoon drawing of himself on Twitter he couldn’t have foreseen the immediate backlash. That is, if the image had just been an image alone, and not a promotion for an upcoming, cycling-themed NFT.

“Matt nooooo not an NFT,” came the replies. “It’s terrible for the environment at worst, and a scam at best.”

The image Stephens had posted was created as part of the Bike Club NFT, which in the couple of weeks between speaking to the people behind it and now has already rebranded simply to ‘Bike Club’.

While the actual NFT project hasn’t been released yet, the people behind it have created a community of cyclists on Discord, which is basically just a nicer, more low-key and vetted version of Twitter. Several pro riders such as Niki Terpstra and Connor Swift are lurking in there, while the likes of Bahrain-Victorious’ Jack Haig is the latest to join as an ambassador and hop onto the Discord server for a chat with its members.

Now you’re asking the difficult questions!

An NFT is a ‘non-fungible token’. NFTs are digital representations, but they are unique – only one exists of each. They are stored on a blockchain, allowing them to be traded.

These digital representations can be pretty pricey, too – Colnago began bidding for its C64 NFT at €5,515. In the context of Bike Club, there are 10,000 unique cyclist avatars, these are yet to go on sale.NFTs are purchased using cryptocurrency. Bike Club is selling its NFTs using […]

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