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Comment: What are candidates’ positions on the new cycling infrastructure?

Comment: What are candidates' positions on the new cycling infrastructure?

A cyclist rides in the bike lane on Fort Street near Chestnut Street. John Farquharson would like to know election candidates positions on the continued…

Thursday, Sep 22

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A cyclist rides in the bike lane on Fort Street near Chestnut Street. John Farquharson would like to know election candidates positions on the continued buildout of Victoria’s bike-lane network. DARREN STONE, TIMES COLONIST In any attempt to level a playing field, in this case that of motorists and cyclists, the issue of fairness is a key consideration.

Some questions for council candidates and voters:

• As they use their preferred mode of transport, are some Victoria motorists being unfairly inconvenienced by the new cycling infrastructure?

• Are some current and potential cyclists in Victoria being unfairly precluded from using their preferred mode of transport due to the missing safety provided by a connected network of bicycle routes?

• Until all remedial traffic calming has been completed, is the temporary disturbance of increased volume on nearby neighbourhood streets worth the permanent benefits of the Richardson bikeway link in an all ages, all abilities (AAA) cycling infrastructure?

To a great extent the answers depend on how much cyclist safety, driver inconvenience and neighbourhood disturbance is required to reap the benefits of increased cycling through safe infrastructure. The benefits include reduced noise and harmful air pollutants, improved physical fitness and mental health, saved money on gas and car expenses, greater equity for Victorians who don’t have a car and reduced risk of injury to cyclists. For motorists, every potential driver on a bike means one less car filling the roadway and competitor for parking spots.

The requisite cycling safety is the 32 kilometres of AAA continuous and […]

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