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Businessmen Love Biking More Than Ever, but the Spandex Needs to Stay on the Road

Businessmen Love Biking More Than Ever, but the Spandex Needs to Stay on the Road

Celyn We’ve become very accustomed to seeing them on the road. You know, the “riders.” Wannabe Miguel Induráins (sorry, Lance—you blew it) wedged into heaving…

Monday, Jul 18

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Celyn

We’ve become very accustomed to seeing them on the road. You know, the “riders.”

Wannabe Miguel Induráins (sorry, Lance—you blew it) wedged into heaving uniforms of fluorescent Grand Tour–branded Lycra , their, ahem, masculinity tokens protruding with all the elegance of a vacuum-packed pallet of bananas.

But even so, there’s something about cycling that remains a bit, well, off. And it’s in the gear. Not just in those silly shoes, surely the world’s most dangerous footwear. Not even ski boots have the power to morph a person into a fleshy-carbon-fiber hybrid like cycling shoes. No, it’s in the way cycling gear is transcending its original purpose—that is, to be used by bicyclists for bicycling.

Since when did it become acceptable to traipse into the office or a café still clad in cycling gear, helmet half-cocked, sweat-slick forming behind you, bananas bunching? At this point, where is everyone else supposed to look? If the environment thanks you, the rest of us are peeling away in embarrassment.

The old maxim was “never let them see you sweat.” But somehow, the cycling uniform, despite its many foibles, is within a real shout of becoming the C-suite casual go-to.

We’ve seen this before—last time, it was golf. At some point, probably in the ’90s, the bland beige-chinos-and-stripy-polo-shirt look migrated from the spike bar to the office, so that men could pack beepers on one side of a belt and rangefinders on the other, making the transition from corridors to fairways of power almost entirely seamless.How long before time-poor […]

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