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A rainy summer means better berms, but more erosion for local mountain biking trails

A rainy summer means better berms, but more erosion for local mountain biking trails

Highlights from the second annual Arapahoe Basin Reverse Enduro mountain bike race on Saturday, July 30. Summit County has seen one of its rainiest Summers…

Sunday, Aug 14

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Highlights from the second annual Arapahoe Basin Reverse Enduro mountain bike race on Saturday, July 30. Summit County has seen one of its rainiest Summers in recent memory , to the extent of potentially ending the region’s drought . The rains have not only impacted the county’s wildfire risk and verdant flora, but its trails, too.

Wet dirt means grippier berms and more control, but it can also mean more ruts and trail damage. Local mountain bikers and trail managers have thoughts on the summer’s trail conditions.

Pete Swenson, trails manager at the Frisco Peninsula Recreation Area, recalled seeing some dusty Junes, but this past June wasn’t one of them. The trails have been tacky and fast thanks to the rains, he said. The National Weather Service reports Summit County has received more rain than water that has evaporated through Aug. 10.

According to the Summit County Mountain Bike Alliance , most local trails are reported dry by recent riders as of Sunday, Aug. 14. Trailforks reports similar conditions in Breckenridge , but rains have not gone unnoticed by those responsible for maintaining trails. A trail sign on the Frisco Peninsula catches the morning light Sunday, Aug. 14. “We’ve enjoyed this near-daily rain,” Swenson said. The rain means more work for trail crews — ruts form when riders make tracks on soft, wet soil and rain washes dirt and sand into drainage ditches — but it’s a good kind of work, Swenson said. Trying to improve trails when the soil is dry […]

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