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7 Myths About Cyclists

7 Myths About Cyclists

PeopleForBikes Bicycling Participation study busts some of the most common myths about cycling. Photo by Thomas Hawk In 2014, PeopleForBikes commissioned the US Bicycling Participation…

Friday, Aug 12

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PeopleForBikes Bicycling Participation study busts some of the most common myths about cycling. Photo by Thomas Hawk In 2014, PeopleForBikes commissioned the US Bicycling Participation Study, a first-of-its-kind benchmark report on cycling participation across the US. Along with painting an encouraging picture of growth in rates of cycling nationwide, the report also collected valuable demographic data on all of these two-wheeled tricksters whizzing down the street. For many people, the demographics would be quite surprising. Despite significant advancements in the rates and popularity of everyday cycling across the continent, cycling still can’t seem to shake the reputation of being an exclusive activity for a very certain few people. Using the data from the Bicycling Participation Study, PeopleForBikes rounded up 7 of the most common myths about cycling and laid them into an infographic, so we can easily see that they are just plain false. Let’s have a look. Myth #1: Not many people ride bikes

The prevailing notion surrounding bicycling in the US is that it is a niche-market activity, confined to the side of highways with the lycra-clad racers or the streets of NYC and San Francisco with the fixie-riding bike messengers. In reality, lots of people are riding bikes. The participation study found that 104 million Americans rode a bike at least once in 2014, accounting for one third of the US population. Myth #2: Bike riders don’t drive cars

A common stereotype about people on bikes is that they’re anti-car or just don’t drive. […]

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