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4,300km in 10 days: how hard is the Transcontinental Race?

4,300km in 10 days: how hard is the Transcontinental Race?

The Transcontinental Race is billed as the world’s toughest self-supported, non-stop ultra-endurance cycling race. Riders pick their own Transcontinental route from A to B, passing…

Monday, Aug 08

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The Transcontinental Race is billed as the world’s toughest self-supported, non-stop ultra-endurance cycling race.

Riders pick their own Transcontinental route from A to B, passing through checkpoints and usually racking up in excess of 4,000km and 40,000m of elevation.

Some riders, such as double-winner James Hayden, take a direct approach on faster roads; others avoid busy thoroughfares but have to do more climbing.

As the cut-off time for the penultimate checkpoint 4 approached, 100 or so hardy athletes were still out on the road 16 days after setting off.

The fastest finishers, on the other hand, sped from Belgium to Bulgaria’s Black Sea coast in 10 days.

But how hard is it exactly?

No one here at BikeRadar has ridden it – not even our in-house ultra-endurance competitor and video manager Felix Smith .Unlike the majority of ten-10 finishers, Ulrich Bartholmoes, who came sixth overall, posted his full route on Strava . We’ve picked some stats from his upload to the cycling app and examined his bike tech choices below. The ride The German was lying just 20 minutes behind eventual winner Christoph Strasser at the penultimate checkpoint before a ferry fiasco cost him four places.Bartholmoes kept his Garmin Edge 1040 solar recording throughout the event, so we can see his 4,324.59km-ride in its entirety. Other riders stopped and saved their activity on their bike computers every day or two days.The sixth-placed rider’s finishing time of 10 days, one hour and 51 minutes converts to 241 hours 41 minutes.Of that elapsed time, he spent 183 […]

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